NAGGING, SCOLDING, ETC.

Summary

Talk, in various manners born of impatience, is condemned as a form of discipline, for it does no good and it is probable that it usually does actual harm.

Principles

1. Nagging, scolding, ridiculing, continual censure, faultfinding, and fretting are all disapproved as techniques of discipline.

It will do no good to reprimand, and accuse, and fret at your scholars when they manifest a spirit of unrest and mischievousness. TSS 69

In our efforts to correct evil, we should guard against a tendency to faultfinding or censure. Continual censure bewilders, but does not reform. Ed. 291

They are not authorized to fret and scold and ridicule. FE 67

2. Nagging only serves to bewilder and does not improve conduct.

It will do no good to reprimand, and accuse, and fret at your scholars when they manifest a spirit of unrest and mischievousness. TSS 69

3. When pupils are restless and mischievous, it will do no good to reprimand, accuse, and fret at them.

In our efforts to correct evil, we should guard against a tendency to faultfinding or censure. Continual censure bewilders, but does not reform. Ed. 291

4. Impatience and fretfulness on the part of a teacher are likely to be due to fatigue rather than to the children's behavior.

When a teacher manifests impatience or fretfulness toward a child, the fault may not be with the child one half so much as with the teacher. Teachers become tired with their work, and something the children say or does not act in accordance with their feelings. CT 193, 194

5. A child frequently censured for some fault may feel that it is a characteristic peculiarly his own, against which it is useless to strive; discouragement, indifference, or bravado may be the result.

A child frequently censured for some special fault, comes to regard that fault as his peculiarity, something against which it is vain to strive. Thus are created discouragement and hopelessness, often concealed under an appearance of indifference or bravado. Ed. 291

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