ATTITUDES OF DISCIPLINARIANS

Summary

Success in discipline--in maintaining good behavior at school and in developing self-control-depends to a large extent on a teacher's attitudes toward children or youth and upon an understanding of what constitutes normal and rational behavior. If pupils or students are problems, it is well for the educator to have the problem-solving attitude toward misconduct rather than to feel frustrated when his charges violate rules or give other evidence of incomplete learning or maladjustments. The teacher cannot stand on his dignity, but must be willing to be a model of self-control himself. The Golden Rule and the mental hygiene viewpoint are important teacher attitudes. Tolerance, affection, sympathy, and courage are prime attributes for the teacher to possess. Finally, the feeling that his students are Christ's children whom he has been given to educate, is necessary in the program of Christian education.

Principles

1. Teachers need to believe in and respect those whom they try to help, especially in behavior and adjustment problems.

If we wish to do good to souls, our success with these should will be in proportion to their belief in our belief in, and appreciation of, them. Respect shown to the struggling human soul is the sure means through Christ Jesus of the restoration of the self-respect the man has lost. FE 281

2. All pupils have equal rights in the way they are to be treated by teachers; there is to be no discrimination against the dullest, the youngest, the most blundering, or even the erring and rebellious.

The Saviour's rule,--"As you would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise,"--should be the rule of all who undertake the training of children and youthàChrist's rule should be sacredly observed toward the dullest, the youngest, the most blundering, and even toward the erring and rebellious. Ed. 292, 293

3. Teachers should have the attitude that every school is a haven where children may be protected from temptations and evil influences, a place where their shortcomings will be understood.

Every school should be a "city of refuge" for the tempted youth, a place where their follies shall be dealt with patiently and wisely. Ed. 293

4. Teachers should love the children who need it most, such as those with disagreeable temperaments, those who try the patience, and the rough, stubborn, and sullen ones.

Give love to them that need it most. The most unfortunate, those who have the most disagreeable temperaments need our love, our tenderness, our compassion. Those who try our patience need most love. FE 281

The rough, stubborn, sullen dispositions are the ones who need help the most. How can they be helped? Only by that love practiced in dealing with them which Christ revealed to fallen man. FE 281

5. Teachers should assent to the "Golden Rule," and it should be carried our in the process of disciplining children and youth.

The Saviour's rule,--"As you would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise,"--should be the rule of all who undertake the training of children and youthàChrist's rule should be sacredly observed toward the dullest, the youngest, the most blundering, and even toward the erring and rebellious. Ed. 292, 293

6. Instead of standing on his dignity, the teacher should have an attitude of kindness and Christian courtesy.

The teacher need lay no special claims to dignity, since he can gain the respect of his pupils in no other way than by a Christlike deportment, in manifesting kindness and Christian courtesy. SSW 174

7. A teacher should have no attitudes that savor of delusions of grandeur; he should not be prone to dictate and order and magnify his authority.

àIt is much more difficult for some to learn than others. The dull scholar needs much more encouragement than he receives. If teachers are placed over these varied minds, who naturally love to order and dictate dn magnify themselves in their authority, who will deal with partiality, having favorites to whom they will show preferences, while others are treated with exactitude and severity, it will create a state of confusion and insubordination. C. Ed. 154

8. Teachers should not hold themselves too much in reserve, nor exercise their authority in a cold, unsympathizing manner.

They often hold themselves too much reserved, and exercise their authority in a cold, unsympathizing manner which cannot win the hearts of their children and pupils. FE 18

9. In place of an attitude of severity, let there be the spirit of love for the erring.

"O that some of the spirit of severity may change to a spirit of loveà" 5T 654

10. "Let authority and affection be blended." E 582

11. Let justice be tempered with mercy and compassion.

Love and tenderness, patience and self-control, will at all times be the law of their speech. Mercy and compassion will be blended with justice. When it is necessary to give reproof, their language will not be exaggerated, but humble. In gentleness they will set before the wrong-doer his errors, and help him to recover himself. Every true teacher will feel that should he err at all, it is better to err on the side of mercy than on the side of severity. Ed. 293, 294

12. Teachers should recognize a difference between insubordination and heedless violation of slight rules.

Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly; or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievous sinned. FE 222

13. Teachers should have the attitude that sometimes circumstances make it legitimate to deviate from rules; rules need not always be held with inflexibility.

Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly; or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievous sinned. FE 222

14. Teachers should recognize that there will be pupils who are far from what they ought to be, and that it is an integral part of the teacher's work to deal patiently and wisely with them, rather than to wish that children were not problems.

"Do not show impatience or harshness. If these children did not need educating, they would not be in school." CT 195

15. Teachers should recall their own childhood and realize that children are still children just as they were when the teachers themselves were children.

Some parents--and some teachers, as well--seem to forget that they themselves were once children. They are dignified, cold, and unsympathetic. FE 68

16. Teachers should be tolerant toward childish mirth and waywardness, restless activity, and trifling misdemeanors.

Childish mirth or waywardness, the restless activity of the yung life, finds no excuse in their eyes. Trifling misdemeanors are treated as grave sins. Such discipline is not Christlike. FE 68

17. Teachers need the mental hygiene attitude; for example, they must sense the need of dealing tenderly with the sensitive, bearing patiently with the dull.

With the dull pupil he should bear patiently, not censuring his ignorance, but improving every opportunity to give him encouragement. With sensitive, nervous pupils he should deal very tenderly. A sense of his own imperfections should lead him constantly to manifest sympathy and forbearance toward those who also are struggling with difficulties. Ed. 292

18. Teachers should know that children are by nature loving and sensitive, easily pleased and easily made unhappy.

"Children have sensitive, loving natures. They are easily pleased ad easily made unhappy." 3T 532

19. Teachers should realize that children are not adult, nor even miniature ones.

"Teachers should remember that they are not dealing with men and women, but with children who have everything to learn." CT 192

20. Teachers are by duty and in fact examples, and should be worthy models.

"Let it never be forgotten that the teacher. Must be what he wishes his pupils be become." FE 58

21. Teachers should look upon their students as Christ's children, whom He wants them to help.

"Teachers, treat your students as Christ's children, whom He wants you to help in every time of need." CT 269

22. Courage and fortitude are attitudes that will ease the teacher's burden.

Sometimes there is in the school a disorderly element that makes the work very hard. Children who have not received a right education make much trouble, and by their perversity make the heart of the teacher sad. But let him not become discouraged. Test and trail bring experience. If the children are disobedient and unruly, there is all the more need of strenuous effort. The fact that there are children with such characters is one of the reasons why church schools should be established. CT 153

23. The fact that children are disobedient and hard to manage is one of the reasons for having schools and should motivate the teacher to exert strenuous effort to help them learn desirable behavior.

Sometimes there is in the school a disorderly element that makes the work very hard. Children who have not received a right education make much trouble, and by their perversity make the heart of the teacher sad. . . Test and trail bring experience. If the children are disobedient and unruly, there is all the more need of strenuous effort. The fact that there are children with such characters is one of the reasons why church schools should be established. CT 153

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