METHOD OR MANNER OR DISCIPLINING

Summary

There are good ways and bad ways to administer discipline. Much depends on the tact and managing ability of the teacher as well as on her or his manner and personality. The teacher's speech is a major factor in creating a favorable or trouble-brewing atmosphere in the school. Behind the successful disciplinarian is a background of love for pupils, which manifests itself in thoughtfulness of others' feelings and in mercy and justice. Discipline should be strict, but reasonable and fair.

Principles

1. Parents and teachers should try to "direct the child's development without hindering it by undue control," too much management, or the breaking of the child's will.

To direct the child's development without hindering it by undue control should be the study of both parent and teacher. Too much management is as bad as too little. The effect to "break the will" of a child is a terrible mistake. Ed. 288

2. Discipline should be adapted to the individual by considering his already-developed character, his past treatment, his age, his temperament, an his education.

Hundreds of youth of various dispositions and of different education are associated in the school, and great care as well as much patience is required to balance in the right direction minds that have been warped by bad management. Some have never been disciplined, and others have been governed too much, and have felt, when away from the vigilant hands that held the reins of control, perhaps too tightly, that they were free to do as they pleased. They despise the very thought of restraint. These varying elements brought together in our college, bring care, burdens, and weighty responsibility, not only upon teachers, but on the entire church. CT 331

There are some children who need more patient discipline and kindly training than others. They have received as a legacy unpromising traits of character, and because of this they need the more of sympathy and love. CT 115

We cannot treat the young and old just alike. There are circumstances under which men and women of sound experience and good standing may be granted some privileges not given to younger students. CT 101

3. The disciplinarian should try to build self-confidence and strengthen honor in the pupil.

"The wise educator, in dealing with his pupils, will seek to encourage confidence and to strengthen the sense of honor." Ed. 289

4. Try to help the pupil save his face and preserve his self-respect.

When this is accomplished point him to the source of pardon and power. Seek to preserve his self-respect, an to inspire him with courage an hope. Ed. 291, 292

5. Try to inspire the student, who is struggling with bad habits or who has misbehaved, with courage and hope.

When this is accomplished point him to the source of pardon and power. Seek to preserve his self-respect, an to inspire him with courage an hope. Ed. 291, 292

6. Bind children with three cords:

(1) Love

(2) Kindness

(3) Strict discipline--the first two are worthless without this third.

The teachers are to bind the children to their hearts by the cords of love and kindness and strict discipline. Love and kindness are worth nothing unless united with the discipline that God has said should be maintained. CT 265

7. Use "tact and delicacy in management," at the same time being a reasonable strict disciplinarian.

To deal successfully with these different minds the teacher needs to exercise great tact and delicacy in management, as well as firmness in government. CT 264

8. Give evidence of interest in students by helping them over the rough places.

"Give them practical evidence of our unselfish interest in them. Help them over the rough places." CT 269

9. Correct a student in such a way as to assure hi that there is no desire to humiliate him, and love for the teacher is likely to result.

Let it be a settled maxim that in all school discipline, faithfulness and love are to reign. When a student is corrected in such a way that he is not made to feel that the teacher desires to humiliate him, love for the teacher springs up in his heart. CT 212

10. Under all conditions manifest kindness and love, and by patience and self-control; keep hold upon your pupil's affection.

You will have to deal with willfulness, stubbornness, indolence, and frivolity; but under all emergencies manifest kindness and love, and by patience and self-control, keep your hold upon your pupil's affection, and let them have reason to know that your whole desire is to do them good. Show your scholars that you have confidence in them. SSW 174

11. Let the pupils see that the teacher's desire is to do them good.

You will have to deal with will-fullness, stubbornness, indolence, and frivolity; but under all emergencies manifest kindness and love, and by patience and self-control, keep your hold upon your pupil's affection, and let them have reason to know that your whole desire is to do them good. Show your scholars that you have confidence in them. SSW 174

12. Show confidence in pupils.

You will have to deal with will-fullness, stubbornness, indolence, and frivolity; but under all emergencies manifest kindness and love, and by patience and self-control, keep your hold upon your pupil's affection, and let them have reason to know that your whole desire is to do them good. Show your scholars that you have confidence in them. SSW 174

13. Do not repel pupils by lack of sympathy, but show affection for them.

It will pay to manifest affection in your association with your children. Do not repel them by lack of sympathy in their childish sports, joys, and griefs. Never let a frown gather upon your brow, or a harsh word escape your lips. God writes all these words in his book of records. Harsh words sour the temper and wound the hearts of children, and in some cases these wounds are difficult to heal. Children are sensitive to the least in justice, and some become discouraged under it, and will neither heed the loud, angry voice of command, nor care for threatens' of punishment. 3T 532

14. Point the pupil to God as a source of help in overcoming faults or bad habits.

When this is accomplished point him to the source of pardon and power. Seek to preserve his self-respect, an to inspire him with courage an hope. Ed. 291, 292

15. It is good to show children that there is scriptural backing for reproof before it is administered.

Parents, bring the precepts of God's word to admonish and reprove your wayward children. Show them a "thus saith the Lord" for our requirements. A reproof which comes as the word of God is far more effective than one falling in harsh, angry tones from the lips of parents. FE 67, 68

16. Show the child that obedience is just and reasonable, "that all things are under law," "that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering."

Let all dealing with him be such as to show obedience to be just an reasonable. Help him to see that all things are under law, an that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering. Ed. 287

17. Show the love of Christ in dealing with students.

"In dealing with their students, teachers re to show the love of Christ." CT 269

18. Christian teachers should pray for and with an erring student.

"The Christian teacher will pray for and with an erring student, but he will not get angry with him." CT 266

19. Maintain a pleasant attitude.

"The Christian teacher will pray for and with an erring student, but he will not get angry with him." CT 266

20. Be kind.

Let kindness be the law of the home and of the school. Let the children be taught to keep the law of the Lord, and let a firm, loving influence restrain them from evil. CT 155

21. Mingle mercy and justice.

"Ómingle mercy with justice." TSS 78

22. Visit them in their homes

"Visit them at their homes [and in dorm rooms], and invite them to your home. Let it be seen that you love them not only in word, but in deed and in truth." SSW 174

23. Use humble language in giving reproof; gentle show the child his error, erring on the side of mercy, helping the child to recover himself.

When it is necessary to give reproof, their language will not be exaggerated, but humble. In gentleness they will set before the wrongdoer his errors, and help him to recover himself. Every true teacher will feel that should he err at all, it is better to err on the side of mercy than on the side of severity. Ed. 294

24. Be sparing of censure.

" But let them be sparing of censure." CT 155

25. Do not order and dictate.

If there are placed over these varied minds teachers who love to order and dictate and to magnify their authority, teachers who deal with partiality, having favorites to whom they show preference, while other's are treated with exactitude and severity, confusion and insubordination will result. CT 192, 193

26. Avoid exactitude and severity.

If there are placed over these varied minds teachers who love to order and dictate and to magnify their authority, teachers who deal with partiality, having favorites to whom they show preference, while other's are treated with exactitude and severity, confusion and insubordination will result. CT 192, 193

27. The erring should not be spoken to harshly or sharply.

He will not speak sharply to the wrongdoer, thus discouraging a soul who is struggling with the powers of darkness. He will let his heart ascend to God for help and angels will come to his side, to help him in lifting up the standard against the enemy; thus instead of cutting off the erring one from help, he will be enabled to gain a soul for Christ. CT 266, 267

28. The teacher should not get angry with the wrongdoer.

"The Christian teacher will pray for and with an erring student, but he will not get angry with him." CT 266

29. Use self-control.

Those who desire to control others must first control themselves. To deal passionately with a child or youth will only arouse his resentment. When a parent or teacher becomes impatient, and is in danger of speaking unwisely, let him remain silent. There is wonderful power in silence. SSW 177

30. Avoid loud, angry commands and threatening of punishment.

Those who desire to control others must first control themselves. To deal passionately with a child or youth will only arouse his resentment. When a parent or teacher becomes impatient, and is in danger of speaking unwisely, let him remain silent. There is wonderful power in silence. SSW 177

31. Do not meet combativeness with a like attitude.

"Do not meet combativeness with combativeness.," SSW 174

32. It is not good to use force in discipline; even if control is gained, the ultimate effect will be harmful to the child.

Minds are constituted differently; while force may secure outward submission, the result with many children is a more determined rebellion of the heart. Even should the parent or teacher succeed in gaining control he seeks, the outcome may be no less harmful to the child. Ed. 288

33. Do not compromise with the stubborn self-will of the child; do not palter with wrong-doing, coax or use bribes, or accept some substitute for compliance.

Neither in the home nor in the school should disobedience be tolerated. No parent or teacher who has at heart the well-being of those under his care will compromise with the stubborn self-will that defies authority or resorts to subterfuge or evasion in order to escape obedience. It is not love but sentimentalism that palters with wrong-doing, seeks by coaxing or bribes to secure compliance, and finally accepts some substitute in place of the things required. Ed. 290

34. Children should not be disciplined as a dumb beast is trained, for this method produces little more than automatons.

The discipline of a human being who has reached the years of intelligence should differ from the training of a dumb animal. The beast is taught only submission to its master. For the beast, the master is mind, judgment, and will. This method, sometimes employed in the training of children, makes them little more than automatons. Mind, will, conscience, are under the control of another. It is not God's purpose that any mind should be thus dominated. Ed. 288

35. Do not show partiality.

If there are placed over these varied minds teachers who love to order and dictate and to magnify their authority, teachers who deal with partiality, having favorites to whom they show preference, while other's are treated with exactitude and severity, confusion and insubordination will result. CT 192, 193