OBJECT OF DISCIPLINE

Summary

It will aid the disciplinarian, whether he be parent or teacher [or student care-providers] , to have a clear conception of desirable goals. They should be to develop a child, and later an adult, who, at any given stage in that development, has an ample degree of self-reliance which is guided by reason an by respect for rightfully constituted authority.

Principles

1. Discipline has as its main purpose the development of self-control or self-government.

The object of discipline is the training of the child for self-government. He should be taught self-reliance and self-control. Therefore as soon as he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience Ed. 287

2. The child should be taught to be self-reliant.

The object of discipline is the training of the child for self-government. He should be taught self-reliance and self-control. Therefore as soon as he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience Ed. 287

3. The child should be taught to act from reason.

The object of discipline is the training of the child for self-government. He should be taught self-reliance and self-control. Therefore as soon as he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience. Ed. 287

4. The basic trait that should be inculcated in the process of development self-control is that of obedience.

One of the first lessons a child needs to learn is the lesson of obedience. Before he is old enough to reason, he may be taught to obey. By gentle, persistent effort, the habit should be established. Thus, to a great degree, may be prevented those later conflicts between will and authority that do so much to create alienation and bitterness toward parents and teachers, and too often resistance of all authority, human and divine. Ed. 287

5. If the child learns obedience while young, he will be the better prepared to live in environments where he will be called upon to subordinate his will to some authority, and will have better attitudes toward all rightful authority, human and divine.

One of the first lessons a child needs to learn is the lesson of obedience. Before he is old enough to reason, he may be taught to obey. By gentle, persistent effort, the habit should be established. Thus, to a great degree, may be prevented those later conflicts between will and authority that do so much to create alienation and bitterness toward parents and teachers, and too often resistance of all authority, human and divine. Ed. 287

6. Obedience to parental authority should become a habit.

One of the first lessons a child needs to learn is the lesson of obedience. Before he is old enough to reason, he may be taught to obey. By gentle, persistent effort, the habit should be established. Thus, to a great degree, may be prevented those later conflicts between will and authority that do so much to create alienation and bitterness toward parents and teachers, and too often resistance of all authority, human and divine. Ed. 287

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