CAUSES AND EFFECT IN DISCIPLINE

Summary

Misconduct has its causes, and no program of discipline should ignore the causes while trying to ameliorate the undesirable symptoms. Causes may lie in the physical or mental health of the pupil, in the home, an even in the school itself.

Principles

1. Disciplinarians should try to discover the cause that is producing the effect of perverse behavior.

The divine Teacher bears with the erring through all their perversityÓ for He traces from cause to effect. The one who is most easily tempted, and is not inclined to err, is the special object of His solicitude. Ed. 294

2. Fretfulness may have been caused by unwholesome food, still undigested; but the mother feels that she cannot spend time to reason upon the matter and correct her injurious mismanagement.

Their fretfulness may have been caused by unwholesome food, still undigested; but the mother feels that she cannot spend time to reason upon the matte and correct her injurious managementÓ Some mothers, in their anxiety to do a great amount of work, get wrought up into such nervous haste that they are more irritable than the children, and by scolding and even blows they try to terrify the little ones into quietude. C. Ed. 163

3. Disciplinary problems arise in school in some cases because children have not been properly disciplined by parents at home.

"They should consider that some children have never been disciplined at home." C. Ed. 237

4. A mother's drive to accomplish work may make her nervous and cause her to use harmful methods of discipline, such as scolding and even blows.

Their fretfulness may have been caused by unwholesome food, still undigested; but the mother feels that she cannot spend time to reason upon the matte and correct her injurious managementÓ Some mothers, in their anxiety to do a great amount of work, get wrought up into such nervous haste that they are more irritable than the children, and by scolding and even blows they try to terrify the little ones into quietude. C. Ed. 163.

5. The teacher himself may be the cause of disorder in the classroom.

Sometimes the teacher carries into the schoolroom the shadow of darkness that has been gathering on his soul. He has been overtaxed, and is nervous; or dyspepsia has colored everything a gloomy hue. He enters the schoolroom with quivering nerves and irritated stomach. Nothing seems to be done to please him; he thinks that his pupils are bent on showing him disrespect; and his sharp criticisms and censure are given on the right hand and on the left. Perhaps one or more of the students commit errors, or are unruly. The case is exaggerated in his mind. . . .

6. The teacher's mood may have an adverse effect on the pupils' behavior.

Sometimes the teacher carries into the schoolroom the shadow of darkness that has been gathering on his soul. He has been overtaxed, and is nervous; or dyspepsia has colored everything a gloomy hue. He enters the schoolroom with quivering nerves and irritated stomach. Nothing seems to be done to please him; he thinks that his pupils are bent on showing him disrespect; and his sharp criticisms and censure are given on the right hand and on the left. Perhaps one or more of the students commit errors, or are unruly. The case is exaggerated in his mind. . . .

7. The teacher's out-of-school habits can produce unfavorable moods, hence the need for sane and temperate living.

Sometimes the teacher carries into the schoolroom the shadow of darkness that has been gathering on his soul. He has been overtaxed, and is nervous; or dyspepsia has colored everything a gloomy hue. He enters the schoolroom with quivering nerves and irritated stomach. Nothing seems to be done to please him; he thinks that his pupils are bent on showing him disrespect; and his sharp criticisms and censure are given on the right hand and on the left. Perhaps one or more of the students commit errors, or are unruly. The case is exaggerated in his mind. . . .

8. A suspicious nature on the part of the teacher may precipitate a slash between teacher and pupils, as, for example, when a teacher may mistakenly think pupils are showing him disrespect.

Sometimes the teacher carries into the schoolroom the shadow of darkness that has been gathering on his soul. He has been overtaxed, and is nervous; or dyspepsia has colored everything a gloomy hue. He enters the schoolroom with quivering nerves and irritated stomach. Nothing seems to be done to please him; he thinks that his pupils are bent on showing him disrespect; and his sharp criticisms and censure are given on the right hand and on the left. Perhaps one or more of the students commit errors, or are unruly. The case is exaggerated in his mind. . . .

Next