MOTIVATION OF DISCIPLINE

Summary

Discipline is learning, even in the narrow sense of classroom conduct and general self-control. So it is necessary to motivate the pupil to good behavior and citizenship if education in this area is to be effective. Appeals may be made to the child's egocentric nature, his reason may be enlisted, object lessons and example may be employed, and he may be reminded of his religious ideals.

Principles

1. Give children high and correct motives for self-restraint.

"Present before them high and correct motives for self-restraint." 2T 260

2. Motivation is better than denunciation or arbitrary restrictions; it is well to direct the mind to something better than display, ambition, or self-pleasing.

Arbitrary measures or direct denunciation may not avail in leading these youth to relinquish that which they hold dear. Let them be directed to something better than display, ambition, or self-indulgence. Bring them in contact with truer beauty, with loftier principles, and with nobler lives. Ed. 297

3. Bringing pupils into contact with true beauty, lofty principles, and noble lives is a fruitful source of motivation to good conduct.

Arbitrary measures or direct denunciation may not avail in leading these youth to relinquish that which they hold dear. Let them be directed to something better than display, ambition, or self-indulgence. Bring them in contact with truer beauty, with loftier principles, and with nobler lives. Ed. 297

4. Allowing a pupil to be of service in the classroom often motivates good behavior, especially allowing him to do something at which he excels.

Cooperation should be the spirit of the schoolroom, the law of its life. The teacher who gains the co-operation of his pupils secures an invaluable aid in maintaining order. In service in the schoolroom many a boy whose restlessness leads to disorder and insubordination would find an outlet for his superfluous energy. Let the older assist the younger, the strong, the weak; and, so far as possible, let each be called upon to do something in which he excels. This would encourage self-respect and a desire to be useful. Ed. 285, 286

5. Teach the child "that all things are under law, and that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering."

Therefore as soon a he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience. Let all dealing with him be such as to show obedience to be just and reasonable. Help him to see that all things are under law, and that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering. When God says, "Thou shalt not," He in love warns us of the consequences of disobedience, in order to save us from harm and loss. Ed. 287

6. Deal with the child in such a way as to show that obedience is just an reasonable.

Therefore as soon a he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience. Let all dealing with him be such as to show obedience to be just and reasonable. Help him to see that all things are under law, and that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering. When God says, "Thou shalt not," He in love warns us of the consequences of disobedience, in order to save us from harm and loss. Ed. 287

7. As soon as a child can understand, enlist his reason on the side of obedience.

Therefore as soon a he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience. Let all dealing with him be such as to show obedience to be just and reasonable. Help him to see that all things are under law, and that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering. When God says, "Thou shalt not," He in love warns us of the consequences of disobedience, in order to save us from harm and loss. Ed. 287

8. Discipline should be for the child's own good, and he should be led to see this.

Wherever it seems necessary to deny the wishes or oppose the will of a child, he should be seriously impressed with the thought that this is not done for the gratification of the parents, or to indulge arbitrary authority, but for his own good. He should be taught that every fault uncorrected will bring unhappiness to himself, and will displease God. FE 68

9. Show the child that faults unconquered will result in unhappiness to himself.

Wherever it seems necessary to deny the wishes or oppose the will of a child, he should be seriously impressed with the thought that this is not done for the gratification of the parents, or to indulge arbitrary authority, but for his own good. He should be taught that every fault uncorrected will bring unhappiness to himself, and will displease God. FE 68

10. Teach children that mistakes, faults, and difficulties conquered may be stepping stones to better conduct and successful living.

Let the child and the youth be taught that every mistake, every fault, every difficulty, conquered, becomes a stepping stone to better and higher things. It is through such experiences that all who have ever made life worth the living have achieved success. Ed. 296

11. Teach that God's prohibitions are to save us from harm and loss.

Therefore as soon a he is capable of understanding, his reason should be enlisted on the side of obedience. Let all dealing with him be such as to show obedience to be just and reasonable. Help him to see that all things are under law, and that disobedience leads, in the end, to disaster and suffering. When God says, "Thou shalt not," He in love warns us of the consequences of disobedience, in order to save us from harm and loss. Ed. 287

12. Show that faults uncorrected displease God.

Wherever it seems necessary to deny the wishes or oppose the will of a child, he should be seriously impressed with the thought that this is not done for the gratification of the parents, or to indulge arbitrary authority, but for his own good. He should be taught that every fault uncorrected will bring unhappiness to himself, and will displease God. FE 68

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