RULES AND DEMOCRACY

Summary

Discipline should be a training in self-government, so pupils and students should have a part in making the rules which are to guide their own conduct. Rules being for the best interest of the social group that makes them, there are times when they may be set aside for the good of the group, or for an individual when doing so for him will not harm the group. In-so-far as possible and practicable, a school situation should be a democratic one with pupils and teachers living according to the spirit of the law.

Principles

1. Rules are sound adjuncts in discipline.

Rules should be few and well considered; and when once made, they should be enforced. Whatever it is found impossible to change, the mind learns to recognize and adapt itself to; but the possibility of indulgence induces desire, hope, an uncertainty, and the results are restlessness, irritability, an insubordination. Ed. 290

2. There should be few rules.

Rules should be few and well considered; and when once made, they should be enforced. Whatever it is found impossible to change, the mind learns to recognize and adapt itself to; but the possibility of indulgence induces desire, hope, an uncertainty, and the results are restlessness, irritability, an insubordination. Ed. 290

3. Rules should be carefully considered.

Rules should be few and well considered; and when once made, they should be enforced. Whatever it is found impossible to change, the mind learns to recognize and adapt itself to; but the possibility of indulgence induces desire, hope, an uncertainty, and the results are restlessness, irritability, an insubordination. Ed. 290

4. Rules should be enforced.

Rules should be few and well considered; and when once made, they should be enforced. Whatever it is found impossible to change, the mind learns to recognize and adapt itself to; but the possibility of indulgence induces desire, hope, an uncertainty, and the results are restlessness, irritability, an insubordination. Ed. 290

5. Under certain conditions deviations from rules may be sanctioned.

I am alarmed for you at Battle Creek. Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievously sinned. Now I want you to consider, teachers, where you stand, and deal with yourselves and pronounce judgment against yourselves; for you have not only infringed the rules, but have been so sharp, so severe upon studentsą FE 222

6. Rules vary in importance; transgression of some is worse than infraction of others.

I am alarmed for you at Battle Creek. Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievously sinned. Now I want you to consider, teachers, where you stand, and deal with yourselves and pronounce judgment against yourselves; for you have not only infringed the rules, but have been so sharp, so severe upon studentsą. FE 222

7. Rules should be considered as flexible, not ironclad.

I am alarmed for you at Battle Creek. Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly; or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievously sinned. Now I want you to consider, teachers, where you stand, and deal with yourselves and pronounce judgment against yourselves; for you have not only infringed the rules, but have been so sharp, so severe upon studentsą FE 222

8. Rules may not always be just or wholesome, but may sometimes be ill considered.

If the youth could see that in complying with the laws and regulations of our institutions, they are only doing that which will improve their standing in society, elevate the character, ennoble the mind, and increase their happiness, they would not rebel against just rules and wholesome requirements, nor engage in creating suspicion and prejudice against these institutions. CT 99-100

(Also "Rules should be few and well considered; and when once made, they should be enforced. Whatever it is found impossible to change, the mind learns to recognize and adapt itself to; but the possibility of indulgence induces desire, hope, an uncertainty, and the results are restlessness, irritability, an insubordination." Ed. 290)

9. The principles involved in a rule should be set before the student so he may be convinced of its justice.

The teacher must make rules to guide the conduct of his pupils. These rules should be few and well-considered, and once made they should be enforced. Every principle involved in them should be so placed before the student that he will be convinced of its justice. Thus he will feel a responsibility to see that the rules which he himself has helped to frame are obeyed. CT 153

10. Pupils should have a part in making rules.

The teacher must make rules to guide the conduct of his pupils. These rules should be few and well-considered, and once made they should be enforced. Every principle involved in them should be so placed before the student that he will be convinced of its justice. Thus he will feel a responsibility to see that the rules which he himself has helped to frame are obeyed. CT 153

11. Gaining the co-operation of pupils is a great help in maintaining order.

Co-operation should be the spirit of the schoolroom, the law of its life. The teacher who gains the co-operation of his pupils secures an invaluable aid in maintaining order. Ed. 285

12. To request is better than to command, for obedience becomes a matter of choice or free will rather than compulsion.

On the same principle it is better to request than to command; the one thus addressed has opportunity to prove himself loyal to right principles. His obedience is a result of choice rather than compulsion. Ed. 290

13. Teachers and parents should come into a democratic, social relation with children so that they may sense that they are part of a well-ordered, self-governing society.

There is danger of both parents and teachers commanding and dictating too much, while they fail to come sufficiently into social relation with their children or scholars. FE 18

14. Teachers should obey the rules, at least in spirit.

I am alarmed for you at Battle Creek. Teachers are very exact in visiting with denunciation an punishments those students who violate the slight rules, not from any vicious purpose, but heedlessly or circumstances occur which make it no sin for them to deviate from rules which have been made, and which should not be held with inflexibility if transgressed, and yet the person in fault is treated as if he had grievously sinned. Now I want you to consider, teachers, where you stand, and deal with yourselves and pronounce judgment against yourselves; for you have not only infringed the rules, but have been so sharp, so severe upon studentsą. FE 222

15. Let students see the value to themselves of complying with just rules and wholesome requirements.

If the youth could see that in complying with the laws and regulations of our institutions, they are only doing that which will improve their standing in society, elevate the character, ennoble the mind, and increase their happiness, they would not rebel against just rules and wholesome requirements, nor engage in creating suspicion and prejudice against these institutions. CT 99-100

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